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U998.7.38
Artist / Maker : Thompson, Art ; Tsa Qwa Supp
Title : Eagle And Ditidaht Salmon
Date (Execution) : 1995/02/09
Geographical Origin : Whyac, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada
Cultural Group : Coast Salish, Cowichan, Nuu-chah-nulth, Ditidaht
Style / Period : Contemporary 1950 -
Medium / Material  : Serigraph
Support / Technique : paper
Object Type : screen prints
Visual Description : Circular. Four circles around picture in blue, green, yellow and red. Main picture is green and black. Eagle at top facing left. Salmon on bottom facing right.
Accession # : U998.7.38
Width (cm) : 68.50
Height (cm) : 66.00
Depth (cm) : 0.00
Mandatory Credit : Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grant, Purchased from the Collection of Vincent Rickard
Artist Statement : "This print is meant to be a 'BRAGGING TOOL'. These were used in situations where our people were being publicly ridiculed about tribal fishing habits. Our chiefs and speaker would get up and talk of inter-tribal wars and how the Ditidaht have for many generations defended all of our territorial rivers and waterways. It is because we have protected them so well through the years that the fish have almost outgrown the rivers. They have become so large that the eagles can no longer lift the from the rivers, and dwarf the eagles themselves. They are so laden with eggs it only takes a few salmon to completely fill the spawning grounds. The salmon are so big it takes only one salmon to feed an entire village. There are so many salmon one could walk across the lake on the backs of all the fish. Many more smoke houses had to be built to accommodate one days catch. There are so many salmon that we could feed all our neighbours forever. This type of language could last for a long period of time depending on how big the chief was and how he felt about the situation at hand. Salmon and eagles have always been a very important part of our people's lives and appear quite regularly in both two dimensional arts as well as carved pieces." - Art Thompson